Collaboration architectures (part of the MWT Model) reintegrate management with the rest of the organisation. Architecting your way to better collaboration will dramatically improve governance and decrease delivery risks. Your project plans will be smaller, easier to manage, and better aligned with your delivery resources. Well architected organisations and projects practically manage themselves. The agility of your organisation will also be improved as collaboration architectures are reused and managed as strategic assets. See also, The New MWT Hierarchy.

 

Blog posts relating to Collaboration Architectures: 

  • Quick thoughts on: Agile, Same as Waterfall?
  • Getting closer to the future of the IT function My views on business capability-based governance extend to the idea that an “IT function” doesn’t really make any sense at the highest governance levels.  However, the implications of this are significant.  So, in the meantime….
  • Industrialised Adhocracy and The Future of Work Excellent overview on Industrialised Adhocracy and The Future of Work: http://www.procurementandsupply.com/resource/David%20Moloney%20-%20Industrialised%20Adhocracy%20-%202nd%20CPO%20Exchange%20-%20July%202014.pdf
  • Analytic teams need their own IT… but should they? As per linchpin project #9 (“Project 9. IT federation: shrinking corporate IT and embracing shadow IT”) we need to view our success in terms of capabilities not functions – and remove any roadblocks to maturing our capabilities.   So this is happening: Big data: Why IT departments mustn’t be a drag on analytics | ZDNet: “‘Technology functions ...
  • 10 linchpin business performance improvement initiatives you should be running right now It’s often difficult to understand how your portfolio of projects is actually helping your organisation deliver to its strategic goals. The problem is that the projects in the portfolio often don’t play a part in ensuring the overall portfolio is easy to navigate and cohesive. You need linchpin projects in your portfolio to hold the ...
  • The end of IT alignment The language of IT alignment has to end. It’s no longer serving any purpose except to isolate disciplines that no longer need to be managed in isolation. The convergence of the commoditisation of IT and the socialisation of business means that IT in its strictest purest sense has won. Paradoxically it also makes IT completely unimportant ...
  • It’s not all about people – it’s about respecting people enough to make the systems work How many times have you had an employee come to you with a complaint about how a process works, or how an IT system is broken, or how they aren’t getting along with another department, and you’ve basically counselled them. You’ve told them how they might get a better result if they approach the situation ...
  • Management as a service, again Nice: If everything is a service, why should management be assigned any priority over anything else? Short answer: no valid reason at all – from a services-perspective, anyway. It’s just another service, or set of services. The only feasible reason why management might be assigned arbitrary priority over other services is from left-over delusions about ‘rights of control’. ...
  • Business Architecture in the never-ending standardisation process of EA At the risk of being controversial, I don’t believe enterprise architecture is about “alignment between IT and the business”.  While there is not doubt that an effective enterprise architecture practice will improve this sort of alignment, it needs to do more than improve the standing of IT or the percentage of the value pie that ...
  • Game Dynamics and Internal Market Making I like the idea that Seth Priebatsch is ‘determined to build a game layer on top of the world’ in the same way I like Jane McGonigal’s work to save the world with games. Seth says in his TEDxBoston talk linked above that while the last 10 years have been about ‘building the social ...