Capabiltiy Engineering  Context

Capability engineering is the development of hard-to-replicate arrangements of people, process, technology, and information to create competitive advantage.

Capability engineering in particular is an alternative to business/IT alignment – which has to end – as introduced in the following blog: http://managewithoutthem.com/2013/03/11/the-end-of-it-alignment/

There are a set of capabilities that define The MWT Firm of the Future and a maturity model for how new capabilities develop across a value chain.

 

 

Blog posts relating to Capability Engineering: 

  • Re: A Pattern is no Best Practice Yet! Great article on patterns by Kris Meukens here.  My slightly self-indulgent reply is below. I’ve always been fascinated by how our understanding of IT and organisational design in general seems to follow the same path of Christopher Alexander’s works on the design and architecture of the built environment.  —  I think it’s interesting to see the ...
  • The IT Department of the Future… doesn’t exist  Good article, including the simple fact: In the industrial company of the future, there won’t be a separate IT department. From: http://www.strategy-business.com/article/The-Thought-Leader-Interview-Bill-Ruh?gko=9ae51
  • Avoiding the B.A.I.T. view of Business Capabilities Reference material added here: Breaking free of B.A.I.T. -based Capabilities
  • The No ICT Strategy Organisation The idea of business / IT alignment is completely at odds with the challenge of business agility.  You can never align all-of-the-business with all-of-the-IT.  You can only ensure that the business capabilities your organisation’s operating model depends on sufficiently utilise information technology in order to ensure competitive levels of productivity, optimal customer experience, and coordination ...
  • Interesting Times at Westpac – Dave Curran, CIO I would have loved to have seen the presentation that’s been given some positive press here.  Westpac are putting some meat around their transformation agenda after having learnt from the experiences of other banks. Many of these large scale transformation programs (think ERPs, CRMs, core systems replacements, etc) have a tendency to teach the organisation about ...
  • Analytic teams need their own IT… but should they? As per linchpin project #9 (“Project 9. IT federation: shrinking corporate IT and embracing shadow IT”) we need to view our success in terms of capabilities not functions – and remove any roadblocks to maturing our capabilities.   So this is happening: Big data: Why IT departments mustn’t be a drag on analytics | ZDNet: “‘Technology functions ...
  • 10 linchpin business performance improvement initiatives you should be running right now It’s often difficult to understand how your portfolio of projects is actually helping your organisation deliver to its strategic goals. The problem is that the projects in the portfolio often don’t play a part in ensuring the overall portfolio is easy to navigate and cohesive. You need linchpin projects in your portfolio to hold the ...
  • Information Management in a Process-based Management Paradigm I conducted a very interesting experiment this week.  I presented a basic information management roadmap workshop at a business process management (BPM) conference.  It went quite well and I think (and know from feedback) that most people got something of value out of it.  That’s not to say it didn’t have the awkwardness of an ...
  • The year of capability engineering keeps on giving After my previous post on “The end of IT alignment“, which was really a post about capability-based governance models, I get this little gem in my inbox this morning: Second, creating meaningful differentiation requires capabilities that are almost always cross-functional. For example, building a competitive global brand requires more than a marketing skill set. It requires ...
  • The end of IT alignment The language of IT alignment has to end. It’s no longer serving any purpose except to isolate disciplines that no longer need to be managed in isolation. The convergence of the commoditisation of IT and the socialisation of business means that IT in its strictest purest sense has won. Paradoxically it also makes IT completely unimportant ...